What kind of snack does Buddha eat as he’s watching TV?

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What kind of snack does Buddha eat as he’s watching TV?

I’m trying to tell you a lot about myself while using just a few words. So now you know something about me: I like to use pictures to supplement words.

There’s also the statement below the picture. It may sound a bit silly. But it stops you in your tracks, the way a koan would.

I am very interested in these kinds of things. Not just koans, but ways to open up to new perspectives.

I think of mindfulness as what naturally happens when we disrupt the mindless default…


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Photo: Sebastian Leon Prado, Unsplash

My friend Ernest was reminiscing about when his son was a little boy. When asked about what happened in his day, Ernest had noticed that his son was very elusive. He found a way around that. When he’d get home, in the evening, he’d kneel to be on the same level as his son, put an arm around his shoulders, and begin: “Let me tell you about my day”.

Before long, the son was excitedly telling Ernest all about his day, including such things as: “And the teacher got mad at me.” And Ernest would ask: “Now, why would she?”…


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Photo: Gianni Scognamiglio / Unsplash

I want to share with you a perspective on creativity. It has to do with myth and ritual.

Myths are stories that civilizations have told about themselves. These stories are often at odds with the observations of modern science. So the word ‘myth’ is often used disparagingly to describe something that is patently not true.

Here, I want to make the case that myths are about poetic truth instead of literal truth. From this perspective, the issue is not about myth vs. objective reality. …


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“I do weekly To-Do lists,” says Steve, “but I’m not good at the follow-through. It’s as if the person writing the list is a different person from the one who has to do the work.”

If you’ve ever felt this way, I suggest a little exercise. We’re going to pretend, for a moment, that there are actually two people involved — one called Management, and another called Labor. And we’re going to let them have a dialogue.

How to stage a lively inner dialogue

Here’s how we’re going to do this. Get 2 chairs. Have them face each other. One chair will be the chair you sit…


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The concept of “hierophany “was dear to Mircea Eliade, the scholar of religious experience. Hierophany is the manifestation of the Sacred. There is a paradox to the Sacred: While it transcends the Ordinary, its manifestation is in the Ordinary, where it hides in plain sight.

Now, this may seem a bit abstract. So I will use an example, something that happened a few years ago, the sordid story of Donald Trump and Stormy Daniels.

Trump’s sexual adventures and his lying and bullying are solidly entrenched in the underbelly of the realm of the Ordinary. But he is not just an…


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Photo: Mauro Paillex / Unsplash

Ask Alta ski instructor James Ledyard to tell you something that would radically improve your skiing, and he might actually talk to you about lion tamers. You might have a second take: What’s that got to do with skiing?
By the way, as you read this article, you’ll see it’s not just about skiing: You’re reading a metaphor about life.

It’s not about being fearless

Well, James would say, there’s something to learn about how lion tamers manage fear. On the one hand, they can’t be “fearless.” Otherwise, they’d be dead. The lion is a powerful animal, and you cannot treat it like a big…


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Photo: Inside Edition / YouTube

It started twenty years ago when Rudy Giuliani glamoured up for a date with Donald Trump at a charity dinner. While star-crossed, the two lovebirds had yet so much to accomplish. It had to wait until after retirement.

The time has finally come. The date is said to be set for February 14. How romantic! And Mar-a-Lago is undergoing a major make-over to welcome the lovebirds.

Jerry Falwell Jr will be officiating at the poolside wedding.

Note: Much of the story may be embellished, but the photo is true.


This 38-second video is based on artificially generated photo-realistic images that feature a man’s full lifespan as if taken in stop-motion photography.

The images were generated for a New York Times article published on November 21, 2020, by Kashmir Hill and Jeremy White: Designed to deceive: do these people look real to you?

The “dream” in the video’s title alludes to the deceptive quality of visual information — fake pictures that look real. Most importantly, it evokes the trance-like state in which we go through life — and the many spiritual traditions exhorting us to awaken.

And so?

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Photo by Lotte Jacobi

He would cross the Connecticut River over the covered bridge between Cornish and Windsor. There, he would sit at the diner and write. Or he would drive to Hartland, also in Vermont, to attend the $12 roast beef dinners at the First Congregational Church, among the first to be there, sitting, writing. He would drive to the Dartmouth College library, and there, and write.

In Cornish, the children of his neighbors, the Bournes, would knock at his door, in the winter, to ask permission to sled down the hill in his property, and they would find him writing.

What was…


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Photo: Jonathan Borba / Unsplash

In my circle of friends, we think of Trump voters as blind to reality and driven by myth. For instance, the idea that COVID is no more harmful than the flu. This is a myth in the derogatory sense of the word: an assumption about reality that is divorced from reality.

Can we legitimately say that polarization has cleaved the country into roughly two halves, one of which is delusional? Is it fair to say that only Trump voters believe in myths, while we are impervious to them?

Myth and human societies

This kind of conclusion flies in the face…

Serge Prengel

Serge Prengel is a therapist in NYC. He is the editor of the Active Pause & Mindfulness podcast, at http://activepause.com

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